"Quite simply, the deadliest blow in all of martial arts. He hits you with his fingertips at 5 different pressure points on your body, and then let's you walk away. But once you've taken five steps your heart explodes inside your body and you fall to the floor, dead."

Overview

The Five-Point-Palm Exploding-Heart-Technique is the most fatal martial art strike used in "Kill Bill: Vol. 2" by Beatrix Kiddo to kill Bill.

About

Known for being the most deadly blow in all of martial arts, the move consists of a combination of five strikes with one's fingertips to five different pressure points on the target's body. After the target walks away and has taken five steps, their heart explodes in their body and they fall to the floor.

History

Although its origin is unknown, one man was known to have mastered this deadly blow in his younger years: Pai Mei.

The move is seen many times in a deleted scene of Kill Bill Vol. 2, where Pai Mei uses it to massacre an entire school of monks in mere minutes, demonstrating its power and ability for a ruthless but quick death to its victims.

Knowledge

This move was taught to Beatrix Kiddo by Pai Mei, and used by Beatrix to kill Bill. Nobody is quite sure why Pai Mei taught Beatrix this deadly move and not Elle nor even Bill, however, Pai Mei must have seen a fundamental difference in character between Beatrix and either Bill or Elle. This is suggested because, although Beatrix represented everything he despised, he agreed to train her. It is ironic however, as he would go on to train Elle under the same conditions except the latter would eventually murder him.

The Five Point Palm Exploding Heart Technique is the deadliest, most fatal blow in all of martial arts.

The Move

The move consists of a series of powerful jabs from the fingertips into five different pressure points on the victim's body. Once finished, the victim is then allowed to walk away. However, once they take five steps, their heart literally explodes inside their body, killing them instantly.

Trivia

External Link

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